Audubon Centennial Edition  The Birds of America

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Plate: 384
Black-throated Bunting
 
Plate: 159
Cardinal Grosbeak
 
Plate: 104
Chipping Sparrow
 
Plate: 094
Grafs Finch or Bay-winged Bunting
 
Plate: 099
Cow-pen Bird
 
Plate: 067
Red winged Starling or Marsh Blackbird
 
 
Henslow's Sparrow
Havell Name
Henslow's Bunting

Common Name
Henslow's Sparrow

Havell Plate No.
070

Paper Size
39" x 28"

Image Size
16" x 12"

Price
$ 600


 


Ornithological Biography
I obtained the bird represented in this plate opposite Cincinnati, in the State of Kentucky, in the year 1820, whilst in the company of Mr. ROBERT BEST, then Curator of the Western Museum. It was on the ground, amongst tall grass, and exhibited the usual habits of its tribe. Perceiving it to be different from any which I had seen, I immediately shot it, and the same day made an accurate drawing of it.

In naming it after the Rev. Professor HENSLOW of Cambridge, a gentleman so well known to the scientifi c world, my object has been to manifest my gratitude for the many kind attentions which he has shewn towards me.

This species is abundant in the State of New Jersey, and breeds there; but of this I was not aware until after my last journey to England, in the spring of 1838, when my friend Dr. JAMES TRUDEAU sent me a specimen procured by himself while in company with our mutual friend EDWARD HARRIS, Esq. This specimen is the fi nest I have seen, although Dr. BACHMAN and myself have procured a great number in South Carolina, where this species abounds in the latter part of autumn, and where some remain during winter. I have found it in great numbers in all the pine barrens of the Floridas, in winter, but mostly in sandy or light soil, in woods thinly overgrown by tall pines. I never saw this species alight on trees, but on the ground, where it spends its time; it runs with rapidity, passing through the grass with the swiftness of a mouse. In the State of New Jersey it is found in ploughed fi elds, and I have no doubt was previously overlooked or supposed to be the Yellow-winged Bunting, to which it bears some resemblance. It has not been observed farther to the eastward than the State just mentioned. Its plumage in spring is more richly coloured than in autumn or winter.

Winters in Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, and Florida. Breeds from Maryland to New York. Abundant. Accidental in Ohio. Henslow’s Bunting Plate 70 The following text is a direct excerpt from the description of the bird as written by Audubon and included with each subscription to the original Havell Edition to Audubon’s “The Birds of America” Only the last portion of the text which describes the biological details of the bird have been omitted for the purpose of brevity.
 

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